Page
Word/Term/Phrase
Meaning
19
Over-light (n)
Too strong of a light, Blanche tells Stella to turn that “over-light” off.
19
Chase it
To follow, Blanche wants water with her drink. “Just water, baby, to chase it!”
19
Drunkard (n)
One who habitually engages in the overindulgence of alcohol. Blanche in reality, is a “drunkard” although she pretends she is not

drunkard.jpg
a drunkard
20
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short-story writer, editor, and literary critic, and is considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and invented the detective-fiction genre.

poe.jpg
edgar allan poe
039_70230.jpg
they look quite similar.

20
Ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir
An allusion to Edgar Allan Poe’s poem titled Ulalume.

The skies they were ashen and sober;
The leaves they were crisped and sere -
The leaves they were withering and sere;
It was night in the lonesome October
Of my most immemorial year:
It was hard by the dim lake of Auber,
In the misty mid region of Weir -
It was down by the dank tarn of Auber,
In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.

She mentions it to insult Stella’s living conditions.
20
L & N tracks
The Louisville and Nashville Railroad was a Class I railroad that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States.
Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for 132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. It was the premier Southern railroad, but also extended its reach far outside its home area, ultimately building a network of nearly 7000 miles of track.
It probably spread all the way into Louisiana and in New Orleans, which is why they leave near the “L&N tracks” this shows the booming economy and the struggle for monetary security and increase back in those harsh days.
L&N.jpg
21
Into the wire
telegraph wire - the wire that carries telegraph and telephone signals. Into the wire is slang for, typing a telegraph. Blanche could not “fit” all the details of her lies into one telegraph, so she chose not to inform Stella that she “is taking a break”

Telegraph.jpg
22
Feather bob
A haircut that was popular in the 20th century. Feather cut hairstyle is short hairstyle in which hair is thin and weak. These hairs are cut down into small layers.
23
highbrow
Used as a noun or adjective, highbrow is synonymous with intellectual; as an adjective, it also means elite, and generally carries a connotation of high culture. Blanche teases polish people to be somewhat like Irish, but less “highbrow”; not as intellectual, aka stupid.
23
Polacks
Offensive Slang Used as a disparaging term for a person of Polish birth or descent. Stanley is a polack.
Synonyms: Pole, Pollack, Stash, Stella, Bohunk, Hunky, Hunkie (all derogatory).
Interesting to note that STELLA is a synonym for polack.
Polacks are so discriminated against, they even have their own jokes
http://www.polishjoke.com/polish_joke-index.htm

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